Archive for the ‘Rockcrawlers’ Category

https://hpisavagex46.wordpress.com. HSP-what? HSP is a China-based RC Car Manufacturer that produces parts and cars for many better known brands in the world. Their most famous offering is the HSP Bazooka, also sold by Redcat Racing as the “Hurricane XTR”, a 1/8 Scale competition-class buggy based on the Kyosho Inferno 7.5. However, in more recent times, they’ve made their foray into the rockcrawler market, and HSP is already beginning to make a name…..

HSP 1/8 Scale RockCrawler

HSP 1/8 Scale RockCrawler

Like most China-produced RC cars, their 1/8 rock-crawlers bear merely a serial number, and they run from 94880-94883. The also have a 94880L, which as the name suggests, is a long-wheelbase version of their stock crawler.

In the wake of the Bazooka buggy, HSP has come to be recognized as the stable of “poor man’s race-horses”, or rather, race-cars. Not necessarily for “poor men”, but RC enthusiasts with less to spend. Yet, they’re able to hold up against the big boys all the same, i.e. the Kyosho Infernos, the Mugen MBX5s, the Team Durangos, Losis, RC8s, etc.

With great achievement, comes great expectation, and HSP doesn’t let down with their 1/8 rock crawlers. Like good rock-crawlers should, they come with twin high-torque RC540 motors, independent gearboxes,  full-metal chassis assembly, aluminium shocks, and fierce-looking 18-screw beadlock wheels with tough knobby high-grip tyres – not forgetting the open option of 4-wheel-steering. All RTR kits also come with a 2.4ghz transmitter and receiver system. Some crawlers on the market actually have plastic suspension arms which really is asking for trouble.

According to much internet speculation, it seems highly possible that Integy Racing approached HSP to produce their “iRock” 1/8 rock-crawler. Way too many visual similarities, if you’d look at the photo.

Integy iRock 4x4 RTR 1/8 Rock Crawler AFA01

Integy iRock 4x4 RTR 1/8 Rock Crawler AFA01 (Same as HSP above?)

Bashers and rockcrawling enthusiasts have described the HSP Rockcrawler to be of extremely high build quality and durability,  and that with just few a few modifications, would be ready for competitive climbing. The generally recommended setup is to replace the lower suspension arms with stiffer, stronger Gmade parts, and the axles too. For those seeking some ditch-water action, they would want to water proof their receivers and coat their batteries in Plasti-Dip.

New Gmade suspension arms and axles for the HSP rockcrawler.

New Gmade suspension arms and axles for the HSP rockcrawler.

Despite it’s excellent purpose-built performance, like most China RC products price is the ultimate draw for enthusiasts to the HSP 1/8 rockcrawler. At the price of a big-name crawler’s race-roller kit, i.e. Axial, you can get a complete HSP rtr rockcrawler.

Here’s what an RCUniverse.com user had to say:

"Hello Everyone I just received my new HSP crawler and its freakin the shiznt. It crawls over dogs, up walls, over curbs, up chairs its allot of fun i can't wait to take it out to the rocks. But i need to upgrade some weak points and then it will be ready for the real world of rock crawling. This is my 6th truck and its worth its weight in gold. lol No i'm kidding but it is a great price for an RTR just make sure you don't pay more than $299.99 there are some online auction stores that are claiming its worth over $1000 and trying to get hundreds more than its worth with out the proper hop ups. i hope this is helpful for anyone wanting to buy one. thanks "

"Hello Everyone I just received my new HSP crawler and its freakin the shiznt. It crawls over dogs, up walls, over curbs, up chairs its allot of fun i can't wait to take it out to the rocks. But i need to upgrade some weak points and then it will be ready for the real world of rock crawling. This is my 6th truck and its worth its weight in gold. lol No i'm kidding but it is a great price for an RTR just make sure you don't pay more than $299.99 there are some online auction stores that are claiming its worth over $1000 and trying to get hundreds more than its worth with out the proper hop ups. i hope this is helpful for anyone wanting to buy one. thanks "

DrewPYFZ6's HSP 1/8 Rockcrawler with New Profile Body, with a "MT-look"

DrewPYFZ6's HSP 1/8 Rockcrawler with New Profile Body, with a "MT-look"

If you’re wondering which model to get, based on my experience with China RC products, always go for the highest number- in this case, the 94883, as it tends to represent the latest edition of the model, unless of course, you want to go for the Long Wheelbase Edition, the 94880L, which I assume is based on the 94880. Perhaps owners of both 94880 and 94883 editions may want to comment on the differences between the two.

In closing, here’s a noteworthy post on HSP by Redharris on RC Universe:

Redharris writes on Traxxas then, and now - and what lies ahead for HSP

Redharris writes on Traxxas then, and now - and what lies ahead for HSP

No-Name Rig?…
What a Joke THAT is……
NAMES get Established when Folks take a chance on a New Product that turns out to be Good!

Cornel OBVIOUSLY was not around 10-15 years ago when Traxxas first entered the Scene…….
Everyone Scorned these new Traxxas Cars and said they were not up to Par with the Real Hobby Grade RC’s…..
10 years later, Traxxas Rules the Market and the Revo is one of the Most Innovative RC’s on the Market…..

Who Knows?…..Drew MAY turn out to be a TRENDSETTER……

In the Mean Time,,,,,Maybe you shouldn’t Dismiss a car that you dont Own and have never Driven?

by Julian Wong
https://hpisavagex46.wordpress.com

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Hey folks, just a post ago, I wrote about Beadlock wheels and what they’re for. I came across this great review article from RCCrawler.com on Beadlock wheels by Montana Scale Designs (MSD), what they’re good for, and how they’re installed. Take it as a generalized write-up. I believe RC beadlock wheels have more advantages and less disadvantages compared to their life-size counterparts. Now, balancing the rim isn’t as big as a concern as the life-sized beadlock rims and tyres. In fact, after you’re through with this article, you should appreciate the application of beadlock wheel setups, and want to get a set for your monster truck. They’re just tougher and more durable, period.

RCCrawler.com- Your #1 source for Radio Controlled Rockcrawling!.

Product Review  MSD 2.2 Beadlock Wheels

Text & photos by Jay Kopycinski

If you’re serious about crawling, you almost assuredly have tried or own several sets of tires based on your rig and terrain you crawl. Along with using different sets of tires, swapping tires, or changing foams or weights comes the hassle of breaking them down from time to time. This typically requires careful cutting of the glue used to hold the tire to wheel, or boiling, or some other means of getting them back apart. RC beadlock wheels cure that problem by using a small ring that bolts to each side of the wheel to pinch and hold the tire bead in the wheel assembly. Swapping tires, foams, or weights simply requires removing and replacing the bolt-on rings.

We got our hands on a set of Erickson 2.2 beadlocks from Montana Scale Designs. The set of four wheels came nicely packaged and we tore into the bubble wrap to find some very trick parts. The wheels come in five different patterns (we got a Double Six set) and the wheels are machined from solid black Delrin® with a beefy 9.5mm thickness. The finish on the wheels was nice and smooth with some slight milling swirls evident on the machined faces.

Since these were designed from scratch to be a rock crawling wheel, they come with a narrow width of 33.2mm (about 1.3″), not including the beadlock rings. Also, to push the track width out a bit, the wheels were designed so the wheel hex is flush with the backside of the wheel. The hex sockets look plenty sturdy, fits a wheel hex snugly, and there are two small holes in each wheel to allow for some tire breathing.

Beadlock rings are used on the front and rear faces, and are machined from 4.8mm thick 6061 T6 plate. Each heat treated aluminum ring is held to the wheel using eight 3 x 13mm button head cap screws. The rings come with a random brushed matte finish, or may be ordered powder-coated as well. Our set included more than enough hardened black screws (stainless optional) to build our wheels, with spares left over. We can appreciate that.

We weighed one of the wheels, with two beadlock rings and hardware and found the total to be 134 grams (4.7 oz.). By comparison, a standard Traxxas Stampede wheel weighs in at 23 grams (0.8 oz.). So, you can definitely see that these wheels add some weight to your tire assembly. It’s all down low and entirely predictable, unlike free-moving weights used inside tires.

When it came time to mount up a set of tires, we grabbed a fresh set of Proline Masher 2000s to give em a try. We were a bit worried that installing all those screws in the Delrin® was going to be annoying, but read on and see. We trimmed up the tire foams, put them in the tires, then slipped the tires onto the wheels. At first, it seemed a bit difficult to get the small tire bead to sit evenly around the machined step on the wheel. However, we quickly found a trick to aid with this process.

We held the tire in one hand and lightly squeezed its outer diameter while pushing the wheel slightly from the backside. This pulled the opposite side tire bead down onto the wheel step and we used a finger to gently push the tire bead and seat it on this step. By using more or less squeezing pressure on the tire and wheel, we were able to adjust how well the bead seated. While continuing to hold these, we laid the first beadlock ring on the wheel and installed two opposing screws, and snugged them down a bit. With this we could release our grip and install the remaining six screws. Next, we worked our way around the ring and tightened the screws a little at a time until they were all snug and even. Finally, we flipped the wheel over and repeated for the other side.

We were surprised at how smoothly the screws went into the wheels, thinking they were going to require more effort on our part. We had one screw that went in snug, but simply found some debris on the threads when we pulled it back out. This may have been leftover machining debris or something we got in the wheel ourselves. All the other screws worked perfectly.

With the tires mounted and beadlock rings snugged down, we grabbed and pulled on the tires trying to separate them from the wheels. No dice. We gave up, thinking we’d tear apart a new set of tires before the wheels would give up the tire bead. No fear of these letting loose.

We mounted the set up on our 2.2 rig and set out to beatem on some rocks. We climbed, side-hilled, descended, and stuck our tires in some nasty notches and, as expected, the tires never thought of leaving the wheel bead. These are some sweet wheels and are currently the only ones backed by a lifetime guarantee against breakage. If you’re looking for stylish, heavy-duty beadlocks, take a look at these at: www.montanascaledesigns.com. They’ll soon have 1.9 tire size versions as well.

Hi folks, I was just getting interested in Rockcrawlers and Short Course Trucks & Short Course Buggies (SCBs). One of the things I noticed is the trend of Beadlock Wheels. How do these work? What are they good for? Are scale Beadlock wheels of any use other than decoration? While we’ll explore scale beadlock wheels in later posts, lets understand more about live-size beadlock wheels….

The following is taken from:

http://www.tundraheadquarters.com/blog/2009/04/29/truck-beadlock-wheels-why-and-what/

Truck Beadlock Wheels – What They Are and Why You Probably Don’t Want Them

Mark | Apr 29, 2009 | Comments 8

When getting more involved in off-roading your truck, it quickly becomes clear that there is a whole world of specialized off-road equipment that exists solely to serve those who are intent on exploring their local wilderness trails. While some of this gear is readily apparent when installed on a truck – like roll bars, nerf bars, and lift kits – there are other items that have a more hidden, mechanical aspect to them, even those which might appear decorative at first.

Anyone interested in off-roading will eventually hear someone talk about beadlock wheels, or perhaps see beadlock wheels installed on a truck. Beadlock wheels are fairly distinctive, as they resemble a standard wheel with a raised steel or polished edge all along the rim which overlaps some of the rubber on the tire. This edge or lip will feature many bolts or rivets.

An example of a simple beadlock rim.

An example of a simple beadlock rim.

It is easy to mistake this accessory as a fashion statement – indeed, since the look is quite distinctive, many companies offer faux beadlock wheels. However, beadlock wheels are actually a specially designed safety device that is designed to protect drivers from having the bead of their tires separate from their rims while driving.

On a street tire, the bead is firmly held onto the rim due to the air pressure inside the tire. At the inflation pressures recommended by the manufacturer, there is little or no danger of bead separation while cruising down the highway. However, if the pressure is allowed to fall below a certain point, then the grip that the tire’s bead has on the lip of the wheel becomes increasingly tenuous. This could lead to it sliding off at the worst possible time.

Why would someone intentionally lower the air pressure in their tires to the point where it could dangerously separate from the wheel? Off-road, tire deflation is often done in order to create a wider footprint for the tire itself. Releasing air causes more sidewall sag, which in turn widens the contact patch on the tire tread. This can be useful when crossing sandy areas, muddy passages or when attempting to better spread out the weight of a vehicle over soggy or uncertain ground.

In other applications, such as drag racing, tires are frequently run with very little air pressure inside of them to not only increase traction via a wider contact patch, but also to encourage sidewall flex when launching a car or truck off the line. This flex absorbs some of the force of the acceleration and helps to prevent tire chatter and spin.

In both cases, beadlock wheels mechanically lock the tire bead to the rim, taking air pressure out of the equation and helping to ensure that the tire remains firmly in place no matter how wild maneuvers might get out on the trail or the strip. Beadlock wheels can also help save drivers should they suffer a flat tire while miles away from civilization, as they can keep the damaged tire from separating from the rim even at zero inflation. This can often mean the difference between an expensive tow and a long, slow drive back to a service station.

Unless you routinely subject your truck to potentially hazardous trail conditions in the middle of nowhere, then there is probably no need to invest in a set of beadlock wheels. Keep in mind that while they work great at low tire pressures run at low speed, the beadlock wheel design is not approved for standard street use by the DOT. In addition, these special rims are not cheap, and while they might look hardcore, there are definitely other more practical areas where you can spend your money to improve your truck (like lift kits, bigger better off-road tires, skid plates and bars, winches, steel bumpers…etc.).

ADDITION: We neglected to mention some of the other disadvantages to beadlock wheels in this article. Unlike a normal wheel, installing a tire on a beadlock wheel is a time consuming process. Each and every bolt on the beadlock must be carefully tightened in a specific pattern. We mentioned that beadlock wheels are expensive, but we forgot to say that most “cheap” beadlock wheels (with cheap being a relative term) and even many expensive wheels are often impossible to balance. This is a big part of the reason that beadlocks aren’t DOT certified. An unbalanced wheel can be extremely dangerous at highway speeds.

Beadlocks are also maintenance intensive – every time you take them out you’ll need to re-torque all the bolts on the beadlock. If one of them breaks, well, you’re going to need to replace the whole set. The reason? Beadlock bolts are pretty small, and they’re designed to share the load and stress from the tire bead equally. When one of the bolts breaks, the rest are all subjected to an inordinate load…which can cause them to fail at the most inconvenient time. So, the prudent move is to replace the set whenever one of the bolts breaks. (That’s not cheap either.)

Finally, beadlocks are big heavy beasts. Their weight reduces your vehicle’s acceleration abilities, and it doesn’t help your fuel economy either.

Bottom Line: Beadlock wheels are for advanced off-road use only. Unless you’re serious about heavy-duty off-road fun, save your pennies for some other off-road accessories.

via Truck Beadlock Wheels – What They Are and Why You Probably Don’t Want Them | Tundra Headquarters.