Posts Tagged ‘Duratrax Evader EXB’

The one interesting thing about the Traxxas Jato 3.3 is that it just isn’t a popular race truck. That is rather surprising… given that the Traxxas Rustler 2.5 and the older Traxxas Nitro Sport were both fairly popular. Yet, while we did have a fair amount of racers backing the Jato 2.5, the 3.3’s predecessor, the 3.3 didn’t gain much of a serious folks’ following much unlike the Revo 3.3 which is basking the glory of in a certain RC “fun segment”.

Traxxas Jato 3.3

Traxxas Jato 3.3

Traxxas Jato 3.3

Traxxas Jato 3.3. If you want to do anything more than speeding in a straight line, change your tyres, like what's been done in the pictured Jato.

Just looking at the stock Jato 3.3.. I don’t quite know what to make of it. It hasn’t got the ribbed front types and knobby rear tyres like most stadium trucks, or even the Jato 2.5, but instead it comes fitted with what Traxxas calls “Asphalt-hugging Anaconda™ performance tires”. The Traxxas people didn’t make it for the (offroad) tracks. Pull a stock Jato 3.3 out of the box and onto your usual off-road RC track and I bet you you’ll be pulling even slower lap timings than a Duratrax Evader EXB – because you’d be driving it so slow just to keep it from wheelie-ing, fish-tailing and running in circles. If you look at the current Traxxas catalogue, you might also realise the very good reasons as to why the Rustler has been upgraded to a 2.4Ghz radio system, but still the same TRX 2.5 Engine: 1) There’s no reason to having two of (almost) the same thing. 2) The TRX 2.5 is still better for racing.

Traxxas Jato 2.5

Traxxas Jato 2.5

A little research on the keywords “Jato Racing” in Google revealed several discussion threads pertaining to racing the Jato – concluding that to maintain a decent amount of control on a Jato on an offroad RC track, you must either richen the fuel setting, or downsize the engine. As it’s been said many times before, when it comes to off-road racing on a track you have to “Go slow to go fast”.

However, this article isn’t written in total condemnation of the Jato 3.3. If what you’re really into is straightaway runs and high speed passes, the Jato 3.3 is your ideal choice. Some even went as far as to add on an RB Innovations Supercharger, which includes a forced-induction carburetor attachment, plus a Nitrous Oxide (NO2) unit. After all, “Brutally Fast” is the main marketing line Traxxas used for the Jato, and indeed the TRX 3.3 engine “belts out more muscle than most tracks can even hold”, hence Traxxas fit the car with street-racing tires and a wheelie bar from the start – so you can spend more time zipping and less time back-flipping.

Traxxas Jato with RB Innovations Supercharger + NO2

Traxxas Jato with RB Innovations Supercharger + NO2. But seriously? I'm no fan of super-charging. Sure sounds cool like, "hey yo ma' bros, imma supercharge my Jato mofos! Badass! Badass!", but that's still no more power and no less lighter, costlier or more durable than swapping the stock TRX 3.3 for an oversized, more powerful engine.

If you already own a Jato 3.3 and wish to make it go even, some modifications for the Jato include a larger engine block. The .18 engines by OS.Engines and Picco apparently produce even more power than the TRX 3.3. AB Mods did a Dyno test on the TRX 3.3 and found it only to be good for 0.98hp. Rather paltry… but considering the light 2.34kg weight, it’s still good for a power to weight ratio of 418hp : 1 tonne and a fast acceleration of 0-60 in 4.2 seconds.

Further thoughts: 0.98hp wasn’t the official figure from Traxxas, but from a few third party dyno-testers. The Hpi Nitrostar K4.6 engine was rated 2.9hp by HPI, yet only 1.32 by dyno-testers. I wonder if the dynos are all faulty or are the manufacturers dishonest. Still, 418hp to the ton is comparable to Ferraris and Lamborghinis out there, and by such accounts, the 4.2 second century sprint makes sense.

Traxxas TRX 3.3 Stock Dyno Reading

Traxxas TRX 3.3 Stock Dyno Reading

Also, Traxxas boasted of a car that’s capable with withstanding crashes at upwards of 55mph.. To be honest, I never expected any car out there to escape unscathed so I found Traxxas’ claim rather brazenly bold. Here’s a video I found…

Advertisements

Wheelies are spectacular to watch. “Wheelies” are when you lift the front wheel or wheels of your vehicle off the ground on a high-speed get-go. Movies make a great deal about movies, and this is commonly associated with muscle cars, monster trucks, scrambler bikes and other over-powered vehicles. If you can’t drive or ride a bike, don’t own a muscle car or monster truck you can still have your share of wheelie action cut out for you – on a much smaller scale, with high-powered RC cars and trucks. There are plenty of RC fanatics around the world who occupy themselves with wheelies, performing the longest wheelie, and building RC models around wheelie-ing, like HPI’s Wheely King.

HPI Wheely King RTR | Get more Wheelies with Wheely King

HPI Wheely King RTR | Get more Wheelies with Wheely King

In order to have great fun doing wheelies with your RC vehicle, here are 7 tips that will help you get more wheelies, better wheelies, and more fun wheelie-ing!

Hpi Savage X | How to Do Wheelies With Your RC Car or Truck?

Screenshot of my Hpi Savage X | How to Do Wheelies With Your RC Car or Truck?

  1. “Have Lots of Power!” – Full-size vehicles that achieve wheelies effortlessly share one thing in common – a high Power-to-Weight Ratio (PWR). The average road car weighs 2 tonnes, has a horsepower rating of 130 bhp, and has a PWR of 130/2 = 65bhp : 1 tonne. In comparison, the typical souped-up Dodge Charger has a PWR of 390 bhp : 1 tonne. Thankfully, hobby rc cars usually have a similarly high PWR! For example, my enhanced Hpi Savage X 4.6 has a horsepower rating of 3.1 bhp, at a weight of about 4.8 kg, or 0.0048 tonnes – that’s a whopping 645 bhp to 1 tonne! All Nitro-engine RC vehicles are well-powered. For electric ones, go for high-torque motors, or the latest, high-voltage brushless motors. Forget the “joke” $20-100 entry-level ones. Decent ones will cost you at least $119.95 – i.e.,the for a Duratrax Evader EXB.
  2. “High C.G. Helps” – Have you ever seen a Lamborghini do a wheelie? Probably you never will to do its low-riding chassis, for a low, stable centre of gravity. If you are planning on an RC vehicle for good wheelie action, I recommend you ditch the drag-racers, road sedans and drift cars in favor of monster trucks, stadium trucks, short course trucks and buggies – in that order of decreasing ground clearance.
  3. “The Right Surface” – Wheelies are most easily-achieved on high-traction surfaces like tarmac or carpet. However, if you own a High C.G. RC vehicle, like the HPI Savage X, the Losi MGT, Traxxas T-Maxx – wheelies on any surface is a piece-of-cake.

    Traxxas Jato 3.3 Wheelie

    Traxxas Jato 3.3 Wheelie

  4. “Back to Front” – If you are operating an electric car or truck, or a nitro one with a reverse gear, first reverse, then immediately accelerate. This will most definitely give you a no-brainer wheelie, as the sudden shift in momentum from backward to forward will cause a front lift. Take heed though… this method may burn your transmission out over time.
  5. “Tighten the Slip” – Tighten your slipper clutch. Your slipper clutch will tend to loosen on a sudden burst of drive torque, when you suddenly floor the accelerator – but you want that sudden torque burst to wheelie, so tighten to reduce slipping.
  6. “Sag Your Ass” – If your shocks are set too stiff, your car will have too much road-holding. Remove some of your suspension travel clips, and use a lower weight of shock oil – I recommend 20-35 wt maximum. This allows your RC vehicle to arch back on hard throttle bursts.
  7. “Use Wheelie Bars” – If your RC car or truck is absolutely powerful, you might experience unintentional back-flips occuring during your wheelies. Wheelie bars remedy this potentially embarrassing problem by putting a limit on how high your front wheels can tilt.

About the author: Julian Wong, aged 26, married and self-employed actively trades stocks and forex, and runs several internet marketing programs. His favorite outdoor past-time is off-road RC cars, and he is a proud owner of a Kyosho Inferno and a HPI Savage X 4.6 – both running on Nitro. If you are interested in RC modification, RC videos, and RC racing, or want to be informed of coupon promotions and RC special deals online, do check out his link RC blog at https://hpisavagex46.wordpress.com .